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Welcome to


Metal Detecting Maine!



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People often wonder why there is such a buzz about metal detecting and why more and more people take to the hobby each year. There is no real answer, but hopefully through this site and forum we can help others better understand the concept. Most detectorists simply enjoy finding a piece of history left behind to disintegrate in the ground. Imagine holding a button torn from a soldier’s uniform in the 1790s or a belt buckle from the same era, or even holding between your fingers a 1724 King George the 1st Half Penny. It actually makes you think about who worked the fields on which you currently stand with your detector, and all the more anxious to see if you can dig something up and actually hold it in your hands... it's never too late to give it a try. Here are a couple tips that might help you get started if you're new to the hobby:

Investing: You can begin detecting with a minimal investment. Detectors can be purchased for as little as $100 and as much as $1,000 or more. Many accessories are available to make your detecting experience more convenient but are not necessary to fully enjoy the hobby. Choosing which detector to buy is the most difficult task involved. Determine what your budget allows and shop within that price range. You can always upgrade at a later date.

Research: Beaches, school yards and parks are great places to detect, but if you are seeking relics and old coins, a little research is necessary. Detectorists enjoy researching the lands they plan to detect. History may have been their worst subject in school but today they are avid historians for their area. There are many, many ways to research your area. This topic has its own sub forum on the message board accompanying this site.

Information on this site will be continuously updated and the accompanying forum will offer a wealth of information. Feel free to sign up (there is no charge to become a member of the forum) and browse around. We welcome everyone to share their finds, experiences and inquiries whether you are considering taking up the hobby as a newbie or you are an experienced detectorist.

We encourage anyone with a little interest to at least give this fun, family oriented hobby a try, but be cautious where you swing your machine. Permission is necessary to detect on private property and federal laws protect historic lands. If you are unsure if detecting is allowed in an area you plan to visit, ASK ahead of time. It can save you a world of headaches as well as preserve the reputation of your fellow detectorists.
Thanks for checking us out –

We hope to see you on the forum! Good luck, and happy hunting to all...!

~The MDM Team~





xxGot the police called on me!

George79
Today at 01:41:51 AM by George79
Views: 6 | Comments: 0

I was up late at my folks' 1830s house in Sullivan and thought I'd head into the yard to swing for a few minutes.  My wife had both the headlamps in her bag, which was in the room where she and the small thing were sleeping.  As a man with a small amount of common sense, I decided to abide by the old rule that you never wake a sleeping dog or a sleeping baby, so I grabbed my mum's baseball hat that had two little LED lights in the brim and headed out the door.

On my parents' property is a little guest house that was built in the twenties or thirties that's not much bigger than a shed.  It's kind of run-down, but I thought I'd try over there first.  Happily swinging and digging trash, I didn't notice that the neighbor had come out onto her porch a couple hundred yards away to let her dog out.  Well, I had just dug a stupidly big piece of aluminum that had taken a good five minutes to get out when my back started to ache a little, so I sat up and stretched.  Fortuitously, the neighbor also looked over just as I looked up.  I saw her lean forward and stare intently at me and shine her flashlight, so I stood up to say hi... Much to my amazement, the second I stood up, she let loose with a scream of "WHAT THE F----!!!"  I was a little bit confused so I waved and said hello... and then I realized that she had probably assumed the two little LED lights on the hat were animal eyes, so when those eyes went from three feet off the ground to six it was probably a bit startling.

Anyways, I thought I'd chalk that one up to good times and moved away back toward the main house to swing around the doorstep, so as not to unnerve her further.  About fifteen minutes later, though, I heard a car slow down (my folks are right on Rt. 1) and I got the once-over with the searchlight.  He drove past, turned around, and then pulled into the driveway.  I thought I'd go over and say hi before the disco lights came on and started waking people up.  Well, it turns out that some people think a man digging holes at one in the morning in the front yard is suspicious behavior... Sheesh.  Some people.  She had called the Staties in to report someone burying something next to the abandoned house (the little guest house) next door.  I thought that was a little weird until I realized that she had probably only seen me digging and didn't know my holes were related to my nerdstick.  The cop was nice about it and figured out that while I might have been engaging in aberrant behavior, I certainly didn't pose a threat.  He headed over to explain the proceedings to the neighbor and I decided to pack it in for the night.  My parents thought it was hilarious the next morning.  Good times indeed.

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